Print view
 

Stanford Medicine study details molecular effects of exercise

Stanford University School of Medicine

Researchers at the School of Medicine have shown how exercise changes the body at a molecular level and have identified blood markers of fitness.

The test could complement treadmill tests, a more traditional clinical evaluation of fitness, and provide individuals with far more nuanced information about their body’s molecular response to exercise.

The blood test is an offshoot of a complex study conducted by a team of researchers that took hundreds of thousands of molecular measurements from a group of individuals before and after exercising.

“Everybody knows exercise is good for you, but we really don’t know what drives that at a molecular level,” said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics. “Our goal at the outset was to conduct a highly comprehensive analysis of what’s happening in the body just after exercising.”

The team tracked molecular markers of a wide array of biological processes, such as metabolism, immunity, oxidative stress and cardiovascular function. Hundreds of thousands of measurements from 36 study participants provided a window into the sea of chemical fluctuations the body experiences during intense exercise. To the scientists’ knowledge, such comprehensive measurements of post-exercise molecular fluctuations have never been performed. What’s more, the team saw that the participants who were most physically fit shared similar molecular signatures in their resting blood samples captured before exercise.

“It gave us the idea that we could develop a test to predict someone’s level of fitness,” said Kévin Contrepois, PhD, director of metabolomics and lipidomics in the Department of Genetics. “Aerobic fitness is one of the best measures of longevity, so a simple blood test that can provide that information would be valuable to personal health monitoring.”

With the preliminary data, the team has created a proof-of-principle test, for which they’ve filed a patent application. The test is not currently available to the public.

A paper describing the study was published May 28 in Cell. Snyder, who holds the Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professorship in Genetics, and Francois Haddad, MD, clinical professor of medicine, are co-senior authors of the study. Contrepois shares lead authorship with postdoctoral scholars Si Wu, PhD, and Daniel Hornburg, PhD, and with clinical assistant professor Kegan Moneghetti, MD, PhD.

A flurry of change

Snyder’s team set out to better understand the molecular shifts that underlie changes in physical fitness. The gold standard of medical fitness assessments is a peak VO2 test, which measures a person’s peak oxygen consumption during intense exercise and uses the score as a proxy for aerobic fitness. But Snyder and his team wanted more detail — specifically, about the ways in which exercise initiates change at the molecular level.

Read about the whole research findings here.

Autor: Hanae Armitage   Quelle: Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care (formerly Stanford Hospital & Clinics), and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, 28.05.2020
"Going International promotes access to education and training for all regardless of social, geographic and national borders."
Weitere News
COVID-19 severity affected by proportion of antibodies targeting crucial viral protein
2020 New York Times Voices
COVID-19 Dashboard EN/PT
WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard
ECDC and WHO call for improved HIV testing in Europe
GHD|EMPHNET Launches Online Courses on Response to Public Emergencies
EUPHA strategy 2020-2025
150 years of the International Review of the Red Cross
Fast coronavirus tests: what they can and can’t do
Lessons learnt from easing COVID-19 restrictions: an analysis of countries and regions in Asia Pacific and Europe
Introducing and lifting non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) on SARS-CoV-2 reproduction number (R) across 131 countries.
Take Action to Prevent the Flu
Three Ways Forward in a Post Covid-19 World
Gender-sensitive Workplace Health Promotion: Why It Is Important and How It Can Be Implemented in Practice
COVID-19: the worst may be yet to come
Medicine shortages in the EU: causes and solutions
Coronavirus Makes Inequality a Public Health Issue
A ‘Cure’ for Ebola but Will it Stop the Outbreak if People Won’t Get Treatment?
The Role of Women’s Organisations in Crisis-Settings
CRA shortage is worsening while demand grows – a vicious circle which opens masses of job opportunities
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers
Junior hospital doctors
90–90–90 Treatment for All
Incident Management System
Incident Management System
An Economy for the 99%
European Virus Archive goes global
Establishing a Global Vaccine-Development Fund

educational newsletter

 

Center of ExcellenceEuropean Health Forum GasteinAnästhesie in Entwicklungsländern e. V.European Public Health Association (EUPHA)AGEM - Arbeitsgemeinschaft Ethnologie und MedizinOÖ Gebietskrankenkasse, Referat für Wissenschaftskooperation Alumni Club Medizinische Universität WienÖsterreichische Akademie der Ärzte